MBI 161 - Elementary Medical Microbiology

Course Syllabus - 2013

Lecture Schedule - 9:00–10:45 am, MTWR; 200 Mosler Hall, Hamilton Campus

May 20
Introduction and Overview
The Main Themes of Microbiology (Cowan: Chapter 1)
The Chemistry of Biology (Cowan: Chapter 2)
Tools of the Laboratory: Methods for Studying Microorganisms (Cowan: Chapter 3)
May 21
Prokaryotic Profiles: The Bacteria and Archaea (Cowan: Chapter 4)
May 22
Eukaryotic Cells and Microorganisms (Cowan: Chapter 5)
An Introduction to the Viruses (Cowan: Chapter 6)
May 23
Elements of Microbial Nutrition, Ecology and Growth (Cowan: Chapter 7)
May 27
Memorial Day - No Classes
May 28
Exam 1 (80 pt; Cowan: Chapters 1-7; Lab Exercises 1-3)
Microbial Metabolism: The Chemical Crossroads of Life (Cowan: Chapter 8)
May 29
Microbial Metabolism: The Chemical Crossroads of Life (Cowan: Chapter 8)
May 30
Microbial Genetics (Cowan: Chapter 9)
Genetic Engineering: A Revolution in Molecular Biology (Cowan: Chapter 10)
June 3
Control of Microbial Growth (Cowan: Chapter 11)
Microorganisms and Food (Cowan: Chapter 24, pp. 769-778)
Drugs, Microbes, Host: The Elements of Chemotherapy (Cowan: Chapter 12)
June 4
Micobe-Human Interactions: Infection and Disease (Cowan: Chapter 13)
June 5
Exam 2 (90 pt; Cowan: Chapters 8-12 and 24 (pp. 769-778); Lab Exercises 4-6)
Overview and Nonspecific Defenses (Cowan: Chapter 14)
June 6
Overview and Nonspecific Defenses (Cowan: Chapter 14)
Specific Immunity and Immunization (Cowan: Chapter 15)
June 10
Specific Immunity and Immunization (Cowan: Chapter 15)
Disorders in Immunity (Cowan: Chapter 16)
June 11
Infectious Diseases Affecting the Skin and Eyes (Cowan: Chapter 18)
June 12
Exam 3 (90 pt; Cowan: Chapters 13-16; Lab Exercises 7-9)
Infectious Diseases Affecting the Skin and Eyes (Cowan: Chapter 18)
June 13
Infectious Diseases Affecting the Skin and Eyes (Cowan: Chapter 18)
June 17
Infectious Diseases Affecting the Nervous System (Cowan: Chapter 19)
June 18
Infectious Diseases Affecting the Cardiovascular and Lymphatic Systems (Cowan: Chapter 20)
June 19
Infectious Diseases Affecting the Respiratory System (Cowan: Chapter 21)
June 20
Exam 4 (90 pt; Cowan: Chapters 17-20; Lab Exercises 10-12)
Infectious Diseases Affecting the Respiratory System (Cowan: Chapter 21)
June 24
Infectious Diseases Affecting the Gastrointestinal Tract (Cowan: Chapter 22)
June 25
Infectious Diseases Affecting the Gastrointestinal Tract (Cowan: Chapter 22)
Infectious Diseases Affecting the Genitourinary System (Cowan: Chapter 23)
June 26
Infectious Diseases Affecting the Genitourinary System (Cowan: Chapter 23)
June 27
Exam 5 (90 pt; Cowan: Chapters 21-24; Lab Exercises 13-16)
Student Evaluation of Course

Lecture Textbook


Laboratory Schedule - 11:00 am – 1:15 pm, MW; 416 Mosler Hall

May 20
Introduction and Overview
Microbes Around Us (Exercise 1... begin)
Microscopy (Exercise 2)
May 22
Microbes Around Us (Exercise 1... complete)
Staining Methods (Exercise 3)
Plate Streaking (Exercise 4... begin)
May 27
Memorial Day - No Classes
May 29
Plate Streaking (Exercise 4... continue)
Serial Dilution and Viable Counts (Exercise 5... begin)
Metabolic Activity (Exercise 6... begin)
June 3
Plate Streaking (Exercise 4... complete)
Serial Dilution and Viable Counts (Exercise 5... complete)
Metabolic Activity (Exercise 6... complete)
June 5
Heat vs. Microbial Growth (Exercise 7... begin)
UV Light vs. Microbial Growth (Exercise 8... begin)
Microscopic Examination of Leukocytes (Exercise 9... begin)
June 10
Heat vs. Microbial Growth (Exercise 7... complete)
UV Light vs. Microbial Growth (Exercise 8... complete)
Microscopic Examination of Leukocytes (Exercise 9... complete)
June 12
Disease Transmission (Exercise 10... begin)
Bacteriological Analysis of Foods (Exercise 11... begin)
Skin and Respiratory Tract Microbiota Assessment (Exercise 12... begin)
June 17
Heat and UV Light Combined Laboratory Report Due (Exercises 8 and 9 - 20 pt)
Disease Transmission (Exercise 10... complete)
Bacteriological Analysis of Foods (Exercise 11... complete)
Skin and Respiratory Tract Microbiota Assessment (Exercise 12... continue)
Urinary Tract Infection Diagnosis (Exercise 13... begin)
June 19
Skin and Respiratory Tract Microbiota Assessment (Exercise 12... complete)
Urinary Tract Infection Diagnosis (Exercise 13... continue)
Antimicrobial Agent Testing (Exercise 14... begin)
June 24
Bacteriological Analysis of Foods Laboratory Report Due (10 pt)
Urinary Tract Infection Diagnosis (Exercise 13... complete)
Antimicrobial Agent Testing (Exercise 14... complete)
June 26
Serological Diagnosis of Infectious Disease (Exercise 15)
Simulated Blood Testing (Exercise 16)
June 27
Urinary Tract Infection Diagnosis Laboratory Report Due (10 pt)

Laboratory Textbook

Elementary Medical Microbiology Laboratory Exercises. 2013. Based on materials generated at Miami University by John R. Stevenson, Kelly Z. Abshire, David B. Stroupe, and Robert A. Brady.

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION


COURSE DESCRIPTION

Elementary microbiology for students interested in a single unit devoted to understanding characteristics and activities of microorganisms and their relation to health and disease. Taught in Hamilton and Middletown only. Does not count as credit toward an A.B. in microbiology.This course is a foundation course for the Biomedical Science thematic sequence, which will satisfy the Miami University liberal education requirement.

Although an understanding of chemistry is strongly suggested, there are no prerequisites for this course. Successful completion of this course will provide the background to better understand the microorganisms that surround us and can affect our health.

Elementary Medical Microbiology is the foundation course for the Biomedical Science thematic sequence, which will satisfy your Miami University liberal education requirement.

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE THEMATIC SEQUENCE

Through exposure to principles and examples of diseases caused by microbial infection, students come to understand the role of microorganisms in development of disease in the human host. Students study the host at the genetic or cell and tissue level and gain an overview of infectious and non-infectious diseases in populations. The sequence fosters understanding of the effects of diseases on human communities and provides a perspective that helps one evaluate health dilemmas and develop strategies to solve them.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

An emphasis will be placed on historical perspective throughout the course. The work of pioneering scientists will be used to introduce various sections of course material. This will provide you with ideas of how one inquires into the unknown.  You will see how some very old observations continue to be highly important today. Advances in technology have led to great discoveries, but new problems arise. The discovery of antibiotics and their impact on life throughout the world will be presented as well as emergence of antibiotic resistance.

You will be challenged to think about all the subject matter. The course will employ critical thinking throughout.  As a member of the class, you should question all aspects of the subject matter.  Is every advance in science good for us? For example, if immunization is viewed as beneficial, should it be required for everyone even if it’s against some individuals’ religious beliefs?  Has anyone contracted a disease from an immunization? Are there immunizations for all infectious diseases? How well do they protect? The course will provide a foundation for understanding new developments. The fostering of continuing interest on personal and global health is a major objective.

The way course material is presented will highlight human diversity. For example, some diseases such as trichomoniasis are symptomatic only in women. Diseases such as tuberculosis have a higher incidence in African Americans and Native Americans than in Caucasians. AIDS in Africa is primarily transmitted heterosexually, but in America most cases occur in homosexual males. Sexually transmitted diseases have a much higher incidence in urban areas. Therefore, factors such as gender, race, economic status, and geographical location directly affect the individual’s chances of developing various infectious diseases.

This course involves extensive use of audiovisual materials. A significant number of figures from the text and other sources are used to illustrate concepts and characteristics of various infectious diseases. For example, when we discuss staphylococci, slides will be shown so you can visualize the appearance of these bacteria as well as a disease, such as impetigo, caused by them.

The laboratory is a very important part of this course. In this setting you will work independently and with others to complete exercises that will not only help you understand basic concepts, but also provide opportunities for discovery. For example, one simple experiment that is done early in the course is to “sample” the environment. Using a sterile swab moistened with sterile water, you will select an area to sample.  The contaminated swab will then be rubbed on the surface of a nutrient agar plate and incubated. A great variety of results will be observed.  This should stimulate your intellectual curiosity.  Why do bacteria grow on skin and hair yet not on doorknobs? Bacteria are widespread in nature but some areas have very few, if any, organisms present. Many of the laboratory exercises require the use of different organisms and different responses are observed. You will see that metabolic characteristics can be used to identify an organism. You will be introduced to a variety of methods used for studying microbes.


Evaluation

Your course grade will be based 75% on your lecture-related performance, and 25% on your laboratory-related performance.

Examinations (440 points): During this four credit hour course, you will take five examinations whose points will be proportional to the number of lectures covered on each. These examinations will be based ~85% on material covered in lecture, and ~15% on material covered in lab. All examinations will include essay questions as well as multiple-choice, matching-multiple-choice and true-false questions. If you miss any of the first four examinations for an acceptable reason, you may take a makeup examination within two class days after the (missed) examination was originally given.

Reflective Reports (20 points): You will be expected to submit two 10-point written reports based on recent news articles (published since last May). These news articles can be from newspapers, magazines or the World Wide Web, but they must be at least 1000 words in length and must have an author. Organization-based information websites are not acceptable sources.

Written reports must be digital, 500-words long and must:

Extra Credit (15 points): You will have the opportunity to earn this extra credit by presenting one of your reflective reports as an oral report during class on the day that your topic is being discussed. If you choose to do this, it is crucial that you:

Laboratory Reports (40 points):

Plagiarism and other infractions of Miami University rules and regulations will be dealt with as described in Chapter 5: Academic Integrity in the Miami University Handbook.

Class Attendance
This course consists of four, 105-minute lecture periods per week. In addition to the lectures, two, 135 minute laboratory sessions are required of every student each week. LABORATORY ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY! Five (5) points will be deducted from your course grade each time you miss a laboratory session (although you are allowed one excused absence without penalty).

Grading Scale - Your course grade will be determined using the following scale:

Grade
Percentage
A+
97-100

A

93-96

A-

90-92

B+

87-89

B
83-86

B-

80-82

C+

77-79

C

73-76

C-

70-72

D+

67-69

D

63-66

D-

60-62

F

0-59

This is a direct quote from the Miami University Handbook:
"If a student is found guilty of academic dishonesty in a class and withdraws from the class, the student will receive the grade of F for the class, and a notation of academic dishonesty will be posted directly beneath the class on the academic record."


Dropping a Course

Dropping a course is a formal administrative procedure; merely ceasing to attend class is not the same as dropping a course. Before dropping a course, a student should consult with his or her instructor and academic adviser. A student may drop a course during the first 20 percent of the course, in which case no grade or other designation will appear on the student’s official record (see the academic calendar).

Withdrawing from a Course

Withdrawing from a course is a formal administrative procedure; merely ceasing to attend class is not the same as withdrawing from a course. Before withdrawing from a course, a student should consult with his or her instructor and academic adviser. A student may withdraw from a course after the first 20 percent of the course and, ordinarily, before the end of 60 percent of the course (see the academic calendar). A grade of W will appear on the student’s official record; a W is not calculated in the student’s grade point average. Refunds follow University policy, available via the Office of the Bursar website at http://www.units.muohio.edu/bur/ 2009-2010 Student Handbook

1. After the first 20 percent of a course through the end of the first 60 percent, a student may withdraw from a course with a signature of acknowledgement from the instructor.

2. After 60 percent of the course is complete, a student may no longer withdraw from a course, unless a petition is approved by the Interdivisional Committee of Advisers. The petition must include the signatures of the course instructor and the student’s academic or divisional adviser. The petition must also describe and document the extenuating circumstances (extraordinary circumstances usually beyond the student’s control) that form the grounds of the petition. If the petition for withdrawal is approved, the student will be withdrawn from the course with a grade of W. If the petition is not approved, the student will be expected to remain in the course (see Section 1.3.E).

3. Only in rare circumstances will a petition to withdraw from a course after 60 percent of the course is complete be approved for reasons of academic performance alone.

4. When possible, a student should continue to attend class until the Interdivisional Committee of Advisers has acted on his or her petition. Non-attendance does not void financial responsibility or a grade of F.


Course Syllabus

Lecture Schedule

Lab Schedule

Micro FAQs

Objectives

Evaluation

Lab Reports

161 Home Page

Study Guides

Study Tips

Reflective Reports

Cool Micro Stuff

Sample Questions

Grades

Report Due Dates

Bugs'n'Drugs


© 2004-2013 John R. Stevenson. All Rights Reserved
Please email questions and comments to:
John R. Stevenson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Microbiology
Miami University
Oxford, Ohio 45056
USA
This document was last modified on Sunday, 19-May-2013 15:58:15 EDT