MBI 414/514 - Immunology Principles
MBI 415/515 - Immunology Principles and Practice

Syllabus

Lecture Outline - Fall 2014

August 25
Introduction and Course Overview
Overview of the Immune System (Chapter 1)
August 27
Cells, Organs and Microenvironments of the Immune System (Chapter 2)
August 29
Cells, Organs and Microenvironments of the Immune System (Chapter 2)
September 1
Labor Day - No Class
September 3
Receptors and Signaling: B and T Cell Receptors (Chapter 3)
September 5
Receptors and Signaling: B and T Cell Receptors (Chapter 3)
September 8
Receptors and Signaling: Cytokines and Chemokines (Chapter 4)
September 10
Receptors and Signaling: Cytokines and Chemokines (Chapter 4)
September 12
Innate Immunity (Chapter 5)
September 15
Innate Immunity (Chapter 5)
Article Report 1 Due
September 17
Examination 1 (Covers Chapters 1-5)
September 19
Complement System (Chapter 6)
September 22
Complement System (Chapter 6)
September 24
Organization and Expression of Lymphocyte Receptor Genes (Chapter 7)
September 26
Organization and Expression of Lymphocyte Receptor Genes (Chapter 7)
September 29
Major Histocompatibility Complex; Antigen Processing and Presentation (Chapter 8)
October 1
Major Histocompatibility Complex; Antigen Processing and Presentation (Chapter 8)
October 3
T-Cell Development (Chapter 9)
October 6
T-Cell Development (Chapter 9)
October 8
B-Cell Development (Chapter 10)
October 10
MidTerm Break - No Class
October 13
B-Cell Development (Chapter 10)
Article Report 2 - Report Due
October 15
Examination 2 (Covers Chapters 6-10)
October 17
T-Cell Activation, Differentiation and Memory Generation (Chapter 11)
October 20
T-Cell Activation, Differentiation and Memory Generation (Chapter 11)
October 22
T-Cell Activation, Differentiation and Memory Generation (Chapter 11)
October 24
B-Cell Activation, Differentiation and Memory Generation (Chapter 12)
October 27
B-Cell Activation, Differentiation and Memory Generation (Chapter 12)
October 29
B-Cell Activation, Differentiation and Memory Generation (Chapter 12)
October 31
Effector Responses: Antibody Mediated Immunity (Chapter 13)
November 3
Effector Responses: CTL and NK Cell Mediated Immunity (Chapter 13)
Effector Responses: Activated Macrophage Mediated Immunity (Chapter 13)
November 5
Immune Response in Space and Time (Chapter 14)
November 7
Immune Response in Space and Time (Chapter 14)
Article Report 3 Due
November 10
Examination 3 (Covers Chapters 11-14)
November 12
Hypersensitivity and Chronic Inflammation (Chapter 15)
November 17
Hypersensitivity and Chronic Inflammation (Chapter 15)
November 19
Tolerance, Autoimmunity and Transplantation (Chapter 16)
November 21
Tolerance, Autoimmunity and Transplantation (Chapter 16)
Infectious Diseases and Vaccines (Chapter 17)
November 24
Infectious Diseases and Vaccines (Chapter 17)
November 26 & 28
Thanksgiving Break - No Class
December 1
Immunodeficiency Disorders (Chapter 18)
December 3
Immunodeficiency Disorders (Chapter 18)
December 5
Cancer and the Immune System (Chapter 19)
Article Report 4 Due
December 8
Final Examination (3:00 - 5:00 pm; Comprehensive... Covers Chapters 1-19)

Textbook


Course Objectives

Immunology Principles (MBI 414/514) is a 3 credit-hour lecture course that will acquaint you with the molecules, cells and organs of the immune system.

Immunology Principles and Practice (MBI 415/515) is a 4 credit-hour lecture-laboratory course that will acquaint you with experimental laboratory techniques in addition to acquainting you with the molecules, cells and organs of the immune system.


Course Policies - MBI 414/514 and MBI 415/515


Course Evaluation

Your course grade will be determined by your performance on:


Your course grade will be determined using the following scale:

Cheating on any aspect of this course may subject to immediate dismissal from the class with a grade of F.


Laboratory Exercise Outline - MBI 415/515


Laboratory Manual - MBI 415/515

Immunology Laboratory Manual. 2014. John R. Stevenson and Joseph M. Carlin, Department of Microbiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH.


Laboratory Instructors - MBI 415/515


Laboratory Objectives - MBI 415/515

The field of immunology has continued to develop at a rapid pace throughout the 20th century and during the early years of the 21st century. Consequently, numerous assays and techniques are available to the professional immunologist. It would not be possible to incorporate all of these in any single course. Therefore, this laboratory course will provide a selective approach to learning only some of the more important immunologic techniques and assays.


Laboratory Attendance - MBI 415/515

You are expected to participate in every laboratory exercise and only one excused absence will be given to students with valid medical excuses or reasons acceptable to their TA. Each additional absence will result in deduction of ten percentage points from your final percentage.


Laboratory Preparation - MBI 415/515

For best performance of the laboratory exercises and best understanding of the course material, it is important to approach the laboratory exercises in a thoughtful, organized way. This includes reading each exercise and writing a half-page of laboratory preparation informationfor each lab exercise on what you will be doing during class before you come to the laboratory. You must turn in this "lab prep info” at the before class begins as evidence of your advanced preparation. Your lab prep info must contain a description of the experimental approach to be used in the exercise together with a description of how the data will be reported. (Note: some days have more than one lab exercise; therefore, you must write more than one lab prep.) Failure to turn in this information on time will result in deduction of five points from your total course points.


Laboratory Quizzes - MBI 415/515

On occasion, your Laboratory Instructor (TA) will give you an unannounced quiz on the material he/she thinks you should understand to best perform the exercise(s) you will be performing in laboratory that day.


Laboratory Notebook - MBI 415/515

Your notebook must be an up-to-date, accurate account of everything you do in this laboratory. It should use the same basic format as your laboratory reports, but is not expected to be as rigorous. This is highly important if you are to get the most out of your laboratory experiences this semester. Your laboratory instructor will assess your notebook twice during the semester to assure that you are developing the record-keeping habits expected of professional microbiologists. Your notebook entries should follow this format:


Laboratory Report - MBI 415/515

You will generate one laboratory report based on the Antibody Response Exercise. It should be well integrated, and follow this format:

In preparing your Laboratory Report, use appropriate material from your textbook, laboratory manual, or lecture notes as well as other books and articles. You should not, however, simply "regurgitate" any of this material (especially the procedural details), because the object of this report is for you to integrate the information and present it in a clear and thoughtful manner in your own words. These reports must be generated using a computer-based word processor. Please remember that plagiarism will not be tolerated!


Academic Integrity

Cheating on any aspect of this course (including plagiarism) will make you subject to University academic dishonesty proceedings as described in the Student Handbook, Undergraduate Academic Regulations Chapter 5.

  • Plagiarism is defined as:
  • Use of Turnitin.com for Pagiarism Detection

    Copyright Notification

    Unless otherwise noted, all materials presented in this course are the intellectual property of the instructor, John R. Stevenson, and may not be distributed to any other individuals besides those in the course without instructor permission.

    Disability Services

    Any student who feels that he/she may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the Rinella Learning Center (located in the Campus Avenue Building) at 529-8741. If you have already registered with this office and would like to discuss your class accommodations for the semester, please set up an appointment to meet with me privately.

  • Credit/No-Credit Status

    Warning: Nationwide studies have shown that credit/no-credit grades on your academic record may be a negative factor in evaluation of your application for admission or employment by most professional schools (law, medicine, etc.), by many graduate schools, and by some employers and undergraduate schools. Before enrolling for courses on a credit/no-credit basis consider what

    The following are only the most problematic of the Credit/No-Credit rules... A full-text version can be accessed in Section 1.2.H of Chapter 2 of Part 1: Undergraduate Academic Regulations of the Student Handbook.

    Students should consult with the Chief Departmental Adviser of their department of major with questions pertaining to courses that may be taken on a credit/no-credit basis.


    Withdrawal Policy


    Syllabus

    Laboratory

    Instructor

    Study Guides

    Sample Questions

    Cool Immuno Stuff

    Study Tips

    Immuno FAQs

    Bugs'n'Drugs


    © 1996-2014 John R. Stevenson. All Rights Reserved

    Please email questions and comments to:
    John R. Stevenson, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    Department of Microbiology
    Miami University
    Oxford, Ohio 45056
    USA

    This document was last modified on Thursday, 09-Oct-2014 14:55:18 EDT